I asked someone today "what's something that surprised you in a positive way since you've been in your current job?", and their response was wonderful. It was about how the people in their field had impressed them so much by how long they stayed in it and the depth of knowledge they'd accumulated as a result. They hardly had to stop to think about that answer. I'm very thankful that I asked and that they were so available to answer.

I attended a really neat talk online today. It opened with some one-on-one icebreakers with another attendee to ease into it, and then the hosts conducted a very high-impact, high-energy group interview. The experience was impressive compared to other 60+ participant talks I've attended, especially online. I walked away with an interesting model for why people might not connect as well as they could: seeing people as "people" and seeing people as representatives of x, y, or z.

I'm so lucky for the people in my life and the time I spend with them. I hope they feel the same way.

I started at an email forwarded by a friend and followed several clicks to arrive at this chapter of "Co-Designing Economies in Transition". I was so engrossed that I spent the next hour reading it. I'm curious how I would use local networks if they were available in my neighborhood.

I'm really grateful for the people in my life. I think I just got really lucky.

I've been really inspired by Adventure Time recently. That and The Midnight Gospel. Both shows that Pendleton Ward has had a hand in. I've got a little crush on both of those series. They're just so great.

Adventure Time feels like an exercise in authenticity, showing what it looks like in a world of creatures and objects with endless diversity and viewpoints. And Jake and Finn largely acknowledge how weird everything is, and then they assert themselves according to their values.

They also question things. I watched more than one episode where Finn is cursed in some way, and as they try to discover the extent of the curse's effects, they sometimes decide that the curse is actually "awesome". A grass sword that cuts perfectly? Hell yeah! Even the sword's maker gets miffed that Jake and Finn aren't bemoaning their misfortune of the curse; their open-mindedness gets them out of ruts that others might have fallen into.

The Midnight Gospel is a whole other arc that pushes the boundaries of imagination even further than Adventure Time does, while also touching truth in a very deep way. It makes you think about death and the meaning of life in new lights. And it does this in a very fun and engaging way.

Both shows embrace new things as exciting and adventurous. And the main characters have flaws that make them relatable and gives their authenticity weight. I'm inspired by the stories themselves and also by their creators' abilities to execute on shows as wild and effective as these.

I learned a new dance move today. Start walking and put "Holding On" by Classixx on your headphones. Match your stride to the beat, then lean back slightly and counterbalance your steps with outstretched arms. Let yourself sink into each downbeat and enjoy! Discovered this gem at the end of my neighborhood jog this morning.

Really thankful for the people I have in my life. They make it more than they probably realize.

I had the most pleasant experience trying out a new Zoom dance class today. I didn't know anyone going into it, nor did I see any sample videos of what it would be like. I just asked to join and they let me! Everyone was so nice and welcoming. It really rewarded my decision to take a chance trying something new.

I had myself an hour-long nap today. I felt much more alert and productive afterwards. Don't be afraid of the hour-long naps; they're worth it.

I'm grateful for my time with people today and am so lucky they chose to spend their time with me.

I came across a new perspective today that has given me a renewed motivation to do the things I want to do: "if I don't use it, then I don't appreciate it". It's the idea that my actions indicate what I value the most, and by contrast, the things I neglect are the things I'm actually not grateful for. I think I can use this to nudge myself even deeper into the activities I already make time for.

I'm so thankful for the opportunities to try new things. Someday, I won't be able to anymore.

Normally, the dog scratches the door to come inside, we hear it, and we let her in. This morning, she scratched loudly and urgently. It was hailing out, and she was not having it. She looked happy once she was inside though. I went out for a run to try to catch the tail end of it.

I found some pretty fun dance classes to try online today. This routine by Jamie Kinkeade is just so fun and contagious that I can't want to start.

So grateful for my health and safety today. It's a joy to use my body to enjoy the weather and enjoy food while I still have it.

During a Zoom dance masterclass today, one of the instructor's wives walked through the background. Then she started teaching. Then they brought their baby into the picture. By the end, it felt like they were having themselves a family house party that just happened to be a dance class. It was wonderful. I bet they kept dancing around in their house after the feed ended.

Many nights, I pick up the dog so she can sleep on my bed. Until recently, I'd always placed one arm through her front legs with my palm on her chest, and the other arm would go out and around her hind-quarters like she's sitting on a chair. It was fine; she seemed to be okay with it. But lately, I've been reaching my first arm much further down her chest so that my palm is a little past her center of gravity. The effect is that her weight is fairly evenly distributed along my forearm, and cupping her back legs is more for balance and comfort than for lift and power. I don't know what she thinks, but it makes her feel much lighter and more secure to me. Too bad I only figured it out just recently.

I'm so lucky to be alive today. I won't always be able to live in peace and to enjoy my surroundings as I'm able to today.

I was trudging up a hill on my bike this afternoon. An elderly man spotted me from his garage and yelled "Get up that hill! Go get it!". He was so enthused and really meant it. I was glowing the rest of the way home.

We watched The Take on Netflix tonight, and I noticed how the quick-cut action sequences focused so intently on the types of things you or I would experience in a highly-arousing environment. It's like they recorded where people's eyes naturally go when sounds are made or quick movements happen, then zoomed in on those moments in quick succession. It was very effective, and it gave me that subtle reminder that making thrilling experiences like the ones in The Take isn't prohibitively out of reach.

I'm so thankful for my health, safety, and family. They will all eventually leave me, and I'm so grateful and lucky to have them today.